Converting natural gas fernice to be used with biogas

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Nick Chase
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Converting natural gas fernice to be used with biogas

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I have a natral gas fernice, what would it take to convert it to run on biogas, and how big of a dijester would I need to heat a 1000 square home.

 
 
 
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Shane Fletcher wow, you'd better do some testing before you jump into this. But the question of heating the home is a calculation you can make with the right variables all filled in. First, Biogas has lower btus than natural gas, so you need to find out the btus prod...Mehr anzeigen
 
Jonathan Haran Generally speaking biogas has about 60% of calorific value of natural gas. So you will need at least 2/3 more volume of biogas at least.
 
Christopher Lindstrom I think the question you need to be asking your self is what kind of feedstock do you have easy access to? Are you on a farm? If you are and you have cows or pigs than you may be in business. Or maybe if you live adjacent to a restaurant or grocery ...Mehr anzeigen
 
Raymond Lee Gross Jr. I have goats and I'm wast deep in manure an just thought this would be a good way to use it up, plus uneaten hay stems. I have a mill to grind it all up. but I don't want to try this if it's not fees able.
 
Shane Fletcher You have to also calculate how much gas you can get from your feedstock at the temperature where you will need the gas production... i.e. in winter. I can tell you without much heavy thinking that gas production is near zero below 18C... since you don'...Mehr anzeigen
 

 

Glenn Lightfoot
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The calculations for the

The calculations for the amaount of gas from food are available on the solar cities website, and i guess elsewhere. I've done some. and at optimum Temperature, with the right microbes, and food, an IBC could produce 6 to 11 kWh of heat. this is not enough to heat a house, but will bang a hole in your hot water heating. I worked out you could have two bursts of about 2 kW for about 3 hours per burst. It all depends on your digester temperature control and your gas storage volume.